ATCP Changes / Changements concernant le niveau de prime ATC

Classification
When the current classification plan was developed by the consulting company Deloitte, the counting methodology for aircraft movements used by NAV Canada was in the early stages of development. Early experiences produced results with errors; some due to new software implementation, some because of differences in understanding how and what should be counted, and some due to human error. A number of initiatives were launched over the years to try to correct the problems. Now, the end result is traffic counts we believe are accurate.

While work was underway to correct these issues, CATCA had discussions with NAV Canada that resulted in an agreement that no units would go down in ATCP or ATC grade until reliable traffic counts were available. During the same period, units were moved up when thresholds were achieved. This approach made sense as we believed not all movements were being accurately recorded. By the time we felt that accurate traffic data was being produced, work had begun with the CATCA Classification Working Group to remove counting from the standard. Therefore again, no action was taken to decrease ATC or ATCP levels that were protected due to traffic movements until we had a clear and solid plan going forward.

As classification work continued, we reached the point where the protected status units (some for many years) will now be adjusted to the correct ATCP levels. No changes will be made to ATC grades for Towers based on lower traffic movements. Any changes to ATC grade will be addressed by the Classification Working Group through its unit reviews, in combination with the ongoing reviews of the Knowledge and Impact factors by the Manager, CATCA Classification. For transparency, the following units would have been subject to an ATC grade decrease by virtue of counting traffic under the old criteria for grade calculations.

Unit

Current Protected
Grade

Actual Grade Under
Current System

Abbotsford

3

2

Buttonville

2

1

Hamilton

2

1

London

3

2

Victoria

4

3

 

Work has already begun to review every Tower on a regular 4-year rotational schedule, or sooner, if required. The outcome of the current Matrix reviews, in combination with the ongoing reviews of the Knowledge and Impact factors by the Manager, CATCA Classification will determine the unit’s grade, and adjustments will be made if required on a go-forward basis.

All Towers with grade protection due to movement data are on schedule to be reviewed using the Matrix tool by end of 2017 with the exception of Buttonville Tower. Buttonville was not subjected to a review as results of an LOS study are about to be released which should see the unit closed. Due to salary protection that accompanies any ATC or ATCP level adjustment, there would be no impact on current salaries before the unit is closed. Calgary, Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver Towers will not be reviewed using the Matrix tool because of their pairing to their respective ACC.

ATCP Levels
There are currently 17 units with protected premium levels. Now that clean traffic counts appear to be occurring, we believe it is time to communicate the current state of ATCP levels and to adjust units down where appropriate. The validity of our classification system relies on units moving up and down on premium according to traffic statistics. ATCP has always been a bonus based in part on how many airplanes you move and must be maintained in the spirit of fairness.

The chart below outlines those units that should have dropped in ATCP. It shows the actual level the unit should be at based on current data, the current protected level, and the date the unit first became protected from a decrease. Some units have dropped multiple times over the years and therefore in some cases, will drop more than one ATCP level.

Unit

ATCP by Traffic

Protected ATCP

Protected Since

Abbotsford

5

6

2011

Boundary Bay

6

7

2011

Buttonville

2

6

2013

Fort McMurray

3

4

2017

Hamilton

2

3

2012

Langley

2 3

2012

London

2

6

2012

Moncton

4

7

2012

Ottawa

7

8

2015

Pitt Meadows

3

4

2013

St. Andrews

3

4

2015

St. Hubert

5

6

2014

Saskatoon

4

5

2017

Vancouver Harbour

3

4

2011

Waterloo

3

4

2009

Victoria

6

7

2013

Winnipeg

7

8

2015

Please note that the “ATCP by Traffic” shown is based on the 2014, 2015 and 2016 traffic data.

ATCP Pay Adjustment
ATCP premium level adjustments for the 17 affected units will be made effective January 1, 2018. Any ab initio trainee who qualifies at one of these units on or after January 1, 2018, will be paid at the correct ATCP level immediately.

For qualified employees currently at these units, the process outlined in the Classification Review report (September 2005) for premium reductions states:

“If a unit moves to a lower ATC premium, employees holding positions in that unit on the date the company advises the union of the change, shall have their ATC premium red circled (frozen) for 2 years, after which they shall move to the lower ATC premium level.”

The spirit of this language was intended to allow unit staff the opportunity to bid out of the impacted unit if they were concerned about their compensation. With the current suspension of the national bid, this option is extremely limited. Therefore, CATCA and NAV Canada are in agreement that the red circling provision will be extended for three (3) years effective January 1, 2018. Any member in an affected unit, or anyone who qualifies in an affected unit before December 31, 2017, will not have their ATCP premiums adjusted to the correct level until January 1, 2021 and shall remain red circled until that time. This will allow members to bid out of a unit when the national seniority bid resumes in 2019 for 2020 training opportunities. The same premium adjustment methodology will apply to any member who previously held a license and is undergoing training at a new unit, or who is deferred for training through the seniority bid program. These members transferred to the new unit based on prior premium levels, so they will be offered the same protection. Of course, if during the period of red circling traffic levels return to prior levels, units will be upgraded, and members will be taken out of red circling protection – their ATCP pay levels will remain unaffected.

Transparency
Members have repeatedly expressed to CATCA that they want more transparency around classification. It has taken us a long time to get to this point, but through the Classification Working Group, we are taking the steps we believe our members want around classification and the transparency of the system on a national basis. On that note, CATCA has added a page to our website here that shows the Grade and ATCP level for every unit, along with the traffic movements being used to calculate that grade and the STI. Please note that the information on the webpage is current now (2017) and is based on 2014, 2015 and 2016 traffic data. The page will be updated as yearly reviews are completed. (You must be signed in to the website to view.)

ACCs
What about the ACCs? After a grievance that was filed on ACC traffic counts, part of the settlement stated:

ATCP premium levels for ACCs shall be: Edmonton – ATCP3, Gander – ATCP4, Moncton – ATCP5, Montreal – ATCP3, Toronto – ATCP1, Vancouver – ATCP4, Winnipeg – ATCP4**. These levels shall not be changed to employees’ detriment before the parties have established a new methodology to be used for counting (that is, a new definition of which “movements” are to be counted). If new levels more advantageous to employees are reached using the current counting methodologies, increases shall occur.

The parties jointly commit to engaging in consultation on the methodology to be used for counting in the future and will endeavor to complete the review process before December 31, 2017.

** Note: All ATCP levels are from the old numbering system and have since changed.

The work on ACC counting methodologies continues and I am not optimistic it will be completed by the end of the year. Until such time as we agree on counting methodologies in ACCs and we agree exactly what is being counted, no ACC ATCP or ATC levels shall drop. As with the protections afforded to Towers all these years, any upward movement shall still be actioned. We will continue our quest to have accurate and standard counts produced for ACCs.

Controllers Performing Non-Control Duties
ATCP for positions where controllers are performing non-control duties will not be changed. The ATCP level for those positions is static to the unit in which the members work. In the case of the National Capital Region, the ATCP paid is an average of all ATCPs nationally.

In solidarity,

Peter Duffey
President
pduffey@catca.ca

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Classification
Quand le système de classification actuel a été mis au point par le cabinet-conseil Deloitte, la méthode du calcul des aéronefs utilisée par NAV CANADA en était encore aux premières étapes de son élaboration. Les premières expériences réalisées ont produit des résultats erronés. Certains d’entre eux étaient dus à l’implantation d’un nouveau logiciel, quelques-uns à des différences dans la compréhension de ce qui devait être compté et de la façon de le faire; et d’autres encore résultaient d’erreurs humaines. Un certain nombre d’initiatives ont été lancées au fil des années pour tenter de corriger ces problèmes. Aujourd’hui, nous disposons de données relatives à la circulation que nous estimons justes.

Tandis que l’on s’efforçait de corriger ces problèmes, des discussions entre ACCTA et NAV Canada ont abouti à une entente selon laquelle ni la classe d’une unité ni son niveau de prime ne pourraient être abaissés tant qu’on ne disposerait pas de données fiables pour le compte des mouvements. Durant cette période, des unités ont grimpé dans l’échelle à mesure qu’elles franchissaient de nouveaux échelons. Cette approche était sensée puisque nous étions d’avis que les mouvements n’étaient pas tous correctement enregistrés. Au moment où nous avons eu l’impression que des données exactes étaient produites en matière de circulation, le groupe de travail sur la classification de l’ACCTA avait déjà entrepris de supprimer des critères le compte des mouvements. Une fois de plus, aucune action n’a été prise pour abaisser la classe ou le niveau de prime ATC d’une unité qui étaient protégés en raison de la circulation; cela ne pourrait être fait qu’une fois qu’un système clair et solide serait défini.

Les travaux concernant la classification se sont poursuivis, si bien que nous sommes arrivés au point où le statut protégé des unités (depuis de nombreuses années dans certains cas) sera corrigé pour refléter le niveau de prime ATC approprié. Aucun changement ne sera apporté à la classe ATC des tours sur la base d’une circulation moindre. Tout changement à une classe ATC sera traité par le groupe de travail sur la classification à l’aide de son évaluation des unités, des facteurs Connaissances et Impact évalués par le gestionnaire, Classification de l’ACCTA. À des fins de transparence, notons que les unités suivantes auraient vu leur classe ATC abaissée sur la base du compte des mouvements et de l’ancien critère pour le calcul de la classe.

Unité

Classe actuelle
protégée

Classe réelle selon
le système actuel

Abbotsford

3

2

Buttonville

2

1

Hamilton

2

1

London

3

2

Victoria

4

3

L’évaluation des tours, selon un système de rotation, tous les quatre ans (ou plus fréquemment si les circonstances le justifient) a déjà commencé. Le résultat des évaluations réalisées à l’aide de la grille actuelle, combiné à celui de l’évaluation continue des facteurs Connaissances et Impact menée par le gestionnaire, Classification de l’ACCTA, déterminera la classe de l’unité et la nécessité éventuelle de procéder ensuite à des rajustements.

Les tours dont la classe est protégée en raison des données sur la circulation devraient faire l’objet d’une évaluation à l’aide de la grille d’ici la fin de 2017, excepté la tour de Buttonville. Cette dernière n’a pas été soumise à une évaluation puisque les conclusions d’une étude sur le niveau de service sur le point d’être publiée devraient entraîner la fermeture de l’unité. En raison de la protection salariale qui accompagne tout rajustement de la classe ATC ou du niveau de prime ATC, les salaires actuels ne seraient pas touchés avant la fermeture de l’unité. Quant aux tours de Calgary, Montréal, Toronto et Vancouver, elles ne seront pas évaluées à l’aide de la grille à cause de leur jumelage avec leur CCR respectif.

Niveaux de prime ATC
À l’heure actuelle, le niveau de prime ATC de 17 unités est protégé. Maintenant que des résultats fiables semblent être obtenus en ce qui a trait à la circulation, nous croyons qu’il est temps de faire le point sur les niveaux de prime ATC et de rajuster à la baisse le niveau de certaines unités, s’il y a lieu. La validité de notre système de classification dépend de la hausse ou de la baisse du niveau de prime des unités ATC en fonction des statistiques. La prime ATC d’une unité a toujours été une gratification fondée en partie sur le nombre de mouvements d’aéronefs assurés par une unité et elle devrait le rester par souci d’équité.

Le tableau ci-dessous indique quelles unités auraient dû voir leur niveau de prime ATC abaissé. Il précise le niveau réel de l’unité selon les données actuelles, le niveau protégé dont elle bénéficie et l’année depuis laquelle la protection empêche ce niveau d’être abaissé. Au fil des années, la circulation à certaines unités a diminué plusieurs fois; le niveau de prime ATC baissera donc de plus d’un échelon.

Unité

Niveau de prime ATC selon la circulation

Niveau de prime ATC protégé

Entrée en vigueur de la protection

Abbotsford

5 6

2011

Boundary Bay

6

7

2011

Buttonville

2

6

2013

FortMcMurray

3

4

2017

Hamilton

2

3

2012

Langley

2

3

2012

London

2

6

2012

Moncton

4

7

2012

Ottawa

7

8

2015

Pitt Meadows

3

4

2013

St. Andrews

3

4

2015

Saint-Hubert

5

6

2014

Saskatoon

4

5

2017

Vancouver Harbour

3

4

2011

Waterloo

3

4

2009

Victoria

6

7

2013

Winnipeg

7

8

2015

Veuillez noter que le « Niveau de prime ATC selon la circulation » indiqué est fonction des données sur la circulation pour la période 2014-2016.

Rajustement salarial en fonction de la prime ATC
Le rajustement du niveau de prime ATC pour les 17 unités concernées entrera en vigueur le 1er janvier 2018. À compter de cette date, tout stagiaire débutant qui se qualifiera percevra immédiatement une prime ATC correspondant au niveau de prime ATC corrigé.

Pour ce qui est des employés qualifiés actuellement affectés à ces unités, le rapport d’examen de la classification (septembre 2005) stipule ceci concernant le processus qui s’applique à la réduction d’une prime :

« Si le niveau de prime ATC d’une unité est abaissé, les employés qui sont affectés à des postes au sein de cette unité à la date à laquelle la Société informe l’Association du changement verront leur prime ATC bloquée (gelée) pour une période de deux (2) ans; après celle-ci, les employés recevront le niveau de prime inférieur. »

L’esprit de cette disposition était de permettre au personnel d’une unité touchée par une réduction de prime de postuler un poste dans une autre unité, si la réduction de prime leur posait problème. Cependant, la suspension actuelle du programme de postulation national limite considérablement cette option. Par conséquent, l’ACCTA et NAV Canada ont convenu de prolonger jusqu’à trois (3) ans le blocage de salaire à partir du 1er janvier 2018. Ainsi, aucun membre affecté à une unité touchée par une réduction de prime ni aucune personne qui se qualifie dans une telle unité d’ici le 31 décembre 2017 ne verront le niveau de leur prime ATC abaissé au niveau corrigé avant le 1er janvier 2021; ces membres et ces personnes nouvellement qualifiées demeureront marqués d’un cercle rouge jusqu’au 1er janvier 2021. Cela permettra aux membres de postuler un poste à l’extérieur de cette unité quand le programme de postulation national sera remis en œuvre en 2019 pour les possibilités de formation offertes en 2020. La même méthode de calcul sera employée pour rajuster la prime des membres qui étaient auparavant titulaires d’une licence et qui suivent une formation dans une nouvelle unité ou dont la formation fait l’objet d’un report dans le cadre du Programme de postulation par ancienneté. Ces membres ayant été mutés à une nouvelle unité selon d’anciens niveaux de prime, ils bénéficieront de la même protection. Évidemment, si la circulation à une unité augmentait et revenait aux niveaux antérieurs pendant la période du blocage de salaire, la classification de cette unité serait revue à la hausse et le blocage de salaire serait annulé; leur niveau de prime ATC demeurerait inchangé.

Transparence
Les membres ont maintes fois exprimé à l’ACCTA qu’ils désirent plus de transparence en ce qui a trait à la classification. Il nous a fallu beaucoup de temps pour y parvenir, mais par l’entremise du groupe de travail sur la classification, nous prenons les mesures désirées par les membres pour rendre la classification, son système et tout ce qu’ils impliquent plus transparents à l’échelle nationale. À ce propos, l’ACCTA a ajouté ici sur son site Web une page sur laquelle sont affichés la classe ATC et le niveau de prime ATC de chaque unité, le nombre de mouvements utilisé pour déterminer la classe chacune et l’indice de la circulation. Veuillez noter que l’information sur cette page est celle de 2017, donc à jour, et qu’elle a été établie en fonction des données sur la circulation pour la période 2014-2016. La page sera mise à jour à mesure que les évaluations annuelles seront effectuées. (Vous devez être connecté au site web pour le voir.)

CCR
Qu’en est-il des CCR? L’accord survenu à la suite d’un grief concernant le compte des mouvements dans un CCR stipule  :

Les niveaux de prime ATC des CCR seront les suivants : Edmonton – ATC 3, Gander – ATC 4, Moncton – ATC 5, Montréal – ATC 3, Toronto – ATC 1, Vancouver – ATC 4, Winnipeg – ATC 4**. Ces niveaux ne pourront être modifiés au détriment des employés avant que les parties aient établi une nouvelle méthode de calcul (à savoir, avant que les parties aient défini quels « mouvements » devraient être comptés). Dans l’intervalle, si de nouveaux niveaux avantageant les employés étaient atteints en employant les méthodes de calcul actuelles, des augmentations entreraient en vigueur.

Les parties s’engagent à mener une consultation sur la méthode de calcul à employer à l’avenir et elles s’efforceront de mener à bien ce processus de révision d’ici le 31 décembre 2017.

** Note : Tous les niveaux de primes ATC correspondent à ceux de l’ancien système de numérotation et ont changé depuis.

Les travaux concernant les méthodes de calcul se poursuivent, mais je doute qu’ils soient terminés d’ici la fin de l’année en cours. D’ici à ce que nous convenions de méthodes de calcul pour les CCR et de ce qui devrait être compté, aucune classe ATC ni aucun niveau de prime ATC ne seront abaissés. Comme cela a été le cas pour les tours pendant toutes ces années, toute hausse sera mise en œuvre. Nous continuerons de rechercher une façon de produire des données cohérentes et précises pour le calcul des mouvements dans les CCR.

Contrôleurs exerçant des fonctions non liées au contrôle de la circulation
La prime ATC accordée pour les postes dans lesquels les contrôleurs exercent des fonctions non liées au contrôle de la circulation demeurera inchangée. Le niveau de prime ATC pour ces postes correspond à celui établi pour l’unité dans laquelle les membres travaillent. Dans la région de la capitale nationale, le niveau de prime ATC équivaut à la moyenne des primes ATC accordées à l’échelle nationale.

Solidairement,

Peter Duffey
Président
pduffey@catca.ca